Tag Archives: Smartphone

Three Fundamental Macro Trends Transforming Our Society, the Way we Live and How We Work

We are living in a ubiquitous mobile era and by the way, don’t  we love it?  Could you imagine for a second a world without smartphones or tablets?  Sooner than later we will start out our day by reading our favorite newspaper while shaving in front of the bathroom mirror.  We’ll continue reading while listening to our car audio system driving to work, then on to our Google glasses while walking to the office, finally catching up with the last paragraph either on our tablets, smartphones, laptops or antiquated PCs.

Smartphone statistics 2012 vs 2011

The Guardian reported on February 22:  “Mobile and social are bringing a dramatic cultural shift to the enterprise. The combination of mobile technology and social capabilities creates dynamics that have never before been possible.”

How can we synthesize the major technical trends that have transformed the way we live and the way we work?  In the last 10 years broadband communication has brought upon us three major changes:  mobile, social and cloud.

1. Mobility   

Gartner predicts that by 2013 mobile phones will overtake PCs as the most common Web access device worldwide and that by 2015 over 80 percent of the handsets sold in mature markets will be smartphones.  By 2015 media tablet shipments will reach around 50 percent of laptop shipments and Windows 8 will likely be in third place behind Google’s Android and Apple iOS operating systems.”

Our digital world citizens have acquired more than one billion smartphones in 2011 and 2012 combined, with a 10.10% increase from 2011 (495.3 million units) to 2012 (545.2 million units).  By 2015 there will be 4.9 billion global mobile users.  Those figures are staggering and prove the “smart” mobile shift happening right now in our society.  Our mobile trend opens incredible new business models and opportunities such as mobile marketing, mobile payment, near field communication (NFC), indoor navigation systems and finally 25 billion apps, which have been already downloaded (iOS and Android).

2. Our 21st century social network society

Less than 10 years ago (2004) Mark Zuckerberg launched Facebook, a social network that would turn the way we communicate upside down.  The membership has passed one billion worldwide and forever changed our notion of privacy.  Less than ten years ago it would have been inconceivable to post pictures on a public domain for just about anyone to see, while Google crawlers constantly index the web to improve the company’s search prowess.  Suddenly people are capable of staying in touch with their friends, while uploading their latest picture hunt they proudly want their communities to see.  Meanwhile, other social tools have popped up:

  • LinkedIn — the 200 million professional network was created in 2002
  • Twitter — the micro-blogging site was started by Mike Dorsey in 2006
  • Caterina Fake’s Flickr image posting tool goes back to 2004
  • YouTube, created by former PayPal employees, was launched in 2005
  • Skype, a proprietary Voice over IP (VoIP), was first released in 2003

and the list goes on and on. Business Insider reports on March 21, 2013: “YouTube hits 1 Billion Monthly Users”, a staggering number of people viewing, uploading and sharing videos from the four corners of our planet.  Mobility is allowing communication in real-time, whenever and wherever it happens!  Traditional structures are being by-passed, new business models are being created.  What is going to happen to our libraries?  Virtual worlds and virtual goods can now be created.  What would happen if one day Facebook decided to create its own currency?  Whatever, wherever, whenever is becoming the new norm of ubiquitous digital communication thanks to broadband technology.  

Sharing information on all sorts of platforms (notebooks, smartphones and tablets) is forcing us to centralize our data storage.  How else would we access our Twitter, LinkedIn or Facebook accounts if all the data had to be stored separately and constantly synchronized, as we used to do it between our PCs and Notebooks?

3. Cloud computing to the rescue

Without cloud computing it would be impossible for any of us to own a Google email account, impossible to tweet or to review and update the content of our LinkedIn accounts.  It is estimated there is one exabyte of data stored in the “cloud”.  All our favorite Evernote bits and pieces are stored in the cloud, so are our Facebook pictures, Twitter favorites and Slideshare presentations.  Additionally, many of us are now moving some our personal data (traditionally stored on hard disks) to cloud services such as Box.com, Dropbox and many others.  Cloud services such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), Mountain Lion’s Apple operating system, introducing services such as iCloud, are popping up everywhere.

Consequently, cloud computing has allowed us to centralize the positioning of our personal data and to access it from any “Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) of our choice, thanks to broadband technology supporting our relentless nomadic lifestyles.  Cloud is the engine, the door opener, the way, the modern broadband electricity trail seamlessly granting access to our data, whenever and wherever we want it.  In 1917 Sears ran an advertisement advising people to “use electricity for more than light”.   At the beginning of the 21st century cloud computing technology is here but still in its infancy.  Nikola Tesla (Никола Тесла; July 10 1856 – January 7th 1943), a Serbian-American, was the inventor of the modern alternating current electrical supply system.  As much as electricity would prove to be much more than powering light bulbs, cloud computing gives us the feasible prospect of eliminating local data storage!  Do you know of anyone storing their own electricity?  Sounds ludicrous right?  It could very well become the same with cloud computing.  Buckle up, it’s going to be an interesting ride.  Our children and native digital citizens will someday look at us wondering how on earth we lived without cloud storage, smartphones and broadband communication — the new digital highway of our 21st century wireless, “clouded” and crowded world.

Cloud Computing General

Photo Credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_Computing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Make Sure Your Website is Geared Towards Mobility: Because Mobile Commerce is growing

All major retailers know they have to go mobile even in conservative Germany like the OTTO Group (yearly ~€ 11.5 billion turnover), second largest online retailer in Europe after Amazon Germany is gearing towards mobility! Herr Hilderbrand (Otto’s e-commerce Manager): “Gross mobile turnover levels accounted for roughly 3% of overall online demand in the spring and summer, and the mobile channel plays a key role in the Otto Group’s e-commerce Strategy”  Otto eCommerce grew from a € 4.95 billion to ~ € 5.3 billion by 9.5%. Hilderbrand “Tablets in particular are playing a big role in the future growth of eCommerce for us” and “Smartphones are used above all to gather information about products, but thanks to the large-format and inspiration display of goods, tablet personal computers invite customers to purchase”.
 
Companies must transform their website for mobility because there is still a lot of speed improvement to get done and address the growing smartphone and tablet crowd more and more inclined to mobile online purchases. According a study made by Keynote Systems Inc. among 5.000 adults with smartphones:
– 64% of smartphone users want a site to load within four seconds
– 82% of smartphone users want a site to load within five seconds
– Average load times of 30 representative retailer’s webpage is 7.54 seconds (Some delivering load times of 2.77 to 3.59 seconds and others 14.65 to 15.20 seconds)
– 60% of tablet users are expecting to wait less than three seconds for a webpage to load
– 48% of PC users are expecting speeds below 2 seconds
– 16% of brand users do not return or wait for a page when it takes too long to load & 6% go to a competitor
Furthermore and according to this study from all smartphones users:
– 88% access local info (maps, event-location)
– 82% search for general information
– 76% use their device for Social Media communication purposes
– 75% for reading books and entertainment
– 74% for finding ATMs or retail stores
Table users have a bit of a different behavior
– 79% use their device for news and entertainment
– 77% for searching general information
– 76% for watching videos
– 75% to access local information
– 74% to take part in social networks
 
According Juniper Research mobile payments are to reach US$ 1.3 trillion (€ 1.04 trillion) annually by 2017, as physical goods sales accelerate!  Over 2.5 billion mobile augmented reality apps to be installed per annum by 2017. Mobile Messaging Adspend to reach US$ 7.4 billion by 2017, driven by increased us of location based ads and mobile transactions to hit US$ 730 billion by 2017 as real world purchases soar.  
 
Is your company getting ready for mobile commerce and developing HTML5 technology to discuss this growing mobile market? Are we preparing ourselves for the onslaught of apps coming upon us? Are we getting ready for augmented shopping reality? 

3 Core reasons why BYOD is only the crawling baby of Enterprise 2.0 competitiveness

Our highly communicative human needs and digital technologies made available have completely overturned the social landscape of the highly connected world we are leaving in! Most of us possess at least two or three public accounts where we share professional & private information with friends, business contacts but also loved ones: It is striking to see how technology trends are driving businesses & marketing but the real revolution of it all is the “People centric” society we are moving into and as CMO Jonathan Becher from SAP says: “big, large, glass buildings do not buy software People do”! SAP, Oracle & IBM used to be IT centric, where you and I had to “adjust” to “their” ways of telling us what to do; now the same vendors are turning around and becoming social, a lot more social being forced to change from a hierarchical to a “wirearchical” thinking! (“Wirearchy” compliment of John Husband @jonhusband)
 
1. Exploding Mobile data consumption
 
BYOD or what I prefer to call BYO3 because there is more than one device by now (Tablet, notebook & Smartphone) are populating our business world as never before! According to Guillermo Escofer: “Mobile data consumption is to grow tenfold over the next five years” He goes on to say “Mobile phone users will, in 2016, on average consume 6.5 times more video, over 8 times as much music and social media, and nearly 10 times as much games as in 2011 according the latest forecasts from Informa Telecoms & Media”. This growth is staggering and much more is to come upon us but particularly upon our mobile phone carriers with a traffic increase from 3.89 trillion MB in 2011 to 39.75 trillion MB in 2016! 
 
2. Big Data Tsunami just started to lashing out on CXOs and Company leaders
 
BigData is completely changing the way we ought to perceive information. According to Dick Weisinger: “Big Data and the related data analytics market segment are expected to grow 40% over the next three years, taking 2010’s annual market size of US$3.2 billion to $16.9 billion by 2015 according IDC. Analyzing data from the past, Business Intelligence will have to adjust and adapt in order to apply a more predictive strategy thus working closely with IT, marketing, controlling & above all customers in order to analyze present trends but also foresee the future as precisely as possible. We all have heard of new companies such as ClouderaKarmasphere or Datammer. All those business are doing much more than “Changing the world one Petabyte at a time”. According  Cloudera we have now 10 times more data than 3 years ago, but “do we know 10 times more about our businesses”? This is a fair and relevant question: How do we store, process, analyze all this in-real-time-data and integrate it seamlessly in all our IT structures and transform it into a predictive analytic-tool made available to our mobile “BYODed” workforce? How are we going to make sense of all this data and synthesize it for our customer’s needs, benefit & superb before and after sales-service? Customer’s virtuous experience circle of excellency must go on right? 
 
 
3. Predictive Data and what it means for the future of our companies
 
Big data is become the limitless marketing’s information blood-flow not only overwhelming Generation X, Echo Boomers or Millenniu ms but especially baby-boomers: a tsunami of “Velocity, Variety and Volume” completely crushing and overtaking our traditional “Old European” hierarchical IT platforms mentalities right? Companies like Apache and their Hadoop approach could increasingly 
become fundamental open source platforms for many companies’ CXOs, who’d better worry about “destroying silo hierarchical” prevailing mentalities as swiftly as possible and start leveraging company crowd-sourcing talents! Time has come to seamlessly integrate Cloud, Storage, Business intelligence, Security IT, Management Software, CRM, SCRM, Operating Systems, Intranet & Extranet to what better place than the Cloud? 
Bigdata forces us to replace our traditional hierarchical management approach to a more wirearchical one: thanks to Jon Husband’s (@jonhusband) fascinating term that macro-captures so well our Enterprise 2.0 trends! Furthermore Charles Zedlewsky Cloudera VP of Products reports that it is not unusual for companies to sift through 100 to 500 Terabytes of data on a daily basis! Will we be soon speaking in yottabyte, zettaby, exabyte or most likely petabyte? How do we make sense of all of this?  BigData “crystallizes as Extreme Information Management Challenges” as Gartner presents it in  a very interesting Cloudera webinar! Big Data comes mostly from “Enterprise Dark Data”: an amount of data which could be coined “unstructured data”, while adding partner, employees, customers, suppliers, public information, social Media and much more!
 
Interesting to notice what BT SecureThinking blog reports in its latest article: “BYOD — it’s now ‘when’ not ‘if’, and China’s leading the way: An incredible 92 per cent of employees in China can take advantage of BYOD, but in the UK less than a third can do this — what does China know that we don’t?” This is again where the traditional “IT Door Keeper” blocs and stops progress. Jeff Schmidt, head of security technology for BT Global Services cuts to the chase: “the security team has to be seen as the enabler not the barrier”! According to Garner, “85% of Fortune 500 organizations will be unable to exploit big data for competitive advantage & Business analytics needs will drive 70% of investments in the expansion and modernization of information infrastructure”
What are your challenges with big data and how do you see the future of dataholic marketers in the upcoming months and years?
 
In my next blog we will look at predictive data and the challenges and chances connected to companies