Category Archives: Cloud Computing

Seven IT Eras Leading CIOs to Become One of the Key Evangelists to a Social Business Strategy (Part 2/2)

In the first part of this two-part series, we reviewed the four IT-eras that have shaped and transformed the CIO role into a digital mediator and one of the key technologists of the new Social Business (Enterprise 2.0) era.  We saw how mainframe computing led to personal computing then followed by Internet and finally the broadband technology.  The consumerization of IT has brought us the “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) movement. BYODs are compelling our 20th century business models (based on the enlightenment era and its resulting industrial revolution) to include workers personal devices such as smartphones, tablets and phablets.           
 
5.  Mobile era
  
Uwe Vielle defines mobile computing as “the ability to use computing capability without a pre-defined location and/or connection to a network to publish and/or subscribe to information.”  Mobility requires new type of softwares or SaaS (Software as a Service) stored in the cloud as well as brand new hardware handsets such as smartphones, tablets and phablets (Samsungs Note II) also known as BYOD.  
 
Post-PC-Era (www.phonedog.com)
 
Two weeks ago, Gartner reported that combined ultra mobile devices, tablets and mobile phone reached 1.872 billion in 2012 and would reach around 2.7 billion by 2017.  Gartner expects a 7.6% decline in PC sales while saying: “This is not a temporary trend induced by a more austere economic environment; it is a reflection of a long-term change in user behavior.”  Broadband and IT-consumerization both contribute to mobility.  Ubiquitous Internet access compels us to centralize our data to a central location: the cloud.
 
6.  Cloud Computing
 
Cloud computing could be compared to the technological shift electricity went through a century ago.  At that time, Thomas Edison favored direct current (DC) systems.  DC was eventually replaced by Guillaume Duchenne’s (1850s) and William Stanley’s (1880s) alternative current (AC).  Alternative current made it much easier to industrialize the production and transport of electricity.  In a similar way the alternative current analogy could be used for cloud computing.  It is not the flow of electric charge that periodically reverses direction, but our computing routines.  IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service) and SaaS (Software as a Service) deliver the foundation upon which private users can upload their personal digital belongings. 
 
Traditional software vendors like Microsoft are transforming their “one way” Office product into an SaaS platform while offering a 20GB SkyDrive cloud storage.  In May,  Flickr rolled out a whopping 1TB (Terabyte) of cloud-storage for free accounts.  Laptops and notebooks paved the way to mobile computing.  Consumerization of IT brought the diversity of multi-screen computing via smartphone, tablet and phablet devices.  This newly acquired ubiquitous mobile  flexibility threatens the very livelihood of US-PC giants such as Dell and Hewlett Packard.   
 
7.  Post PC era
 
Broadband, mobility and cloud computing confirm the steady decline in the sales of personal computers in favor of “post-PC” BOYDs.  BYOD threatens the use of traditional software in favor of cross-platform applications such as Android, Java or iOS.  In 1999, Microsoft CEO Bill Gates coined this development as the “PC Plus” era.  In 2007, Steve Job renamed it the “post-PC device” era.  According to IDC the U.S. PC market contracted 12.7% year-to-year with a 18.3% decline compared to the fourth quarter of 2012.  “A new report from International Data Corporation (IDC) shows a 13.9% decline in first quarter PC shipments compared to 2012.  The ‘year-on-year contraction marked the worst quarter since IDC began tracking the PC market quarterly in 1994,’ according to IDC.”  
 
Post-PC-Era (www.intomobile.com)-medium
 
The US PC-industry is in a dire position.  Last year Hewlett Packard announced that it would lay off over 27,000 employees.  Dell’s troublesome privatization endeavors are still going on and a 274-page proxy filing  states,  “Dell – the company and the man – wants to move away from PCs because making money in the global PC market is about as easy as selling tap water in a rainstorm”. 
 
8.  Social Business   
 
Not too long ago, the CIO was considered (and in many cases still is) the technological IT-drill sergeant in many companies.  He was the technological door keeper, who in the name of “security” only granted employees the right to specific choices of hardware and software.  A major shift began when computing mobility entered enterprises with the use of laptops and notebooks.  Emails and data access became mandatory and VPN (virtual private networks) were created.  Consumerization of IT could be for the former CIO king what the 1789 French Revolution was to Louis XIV.  CIOs are losing their controlling grip and are forced to accept the BYOD revolution and the respective operating systems such as Symbian, iOS, Android, Window & Blackberry to name just a few.  Added to this culinary buffet of BOYDs and operating systems let’s not forget our newly acquired social media channels.  Social media are transforming customer service, experience and marketing altogether and terminates the traditional hierarchical company customer communication era.  Traditional outbound marketing methods (pay, pray and spray) are being replaced with inbound/content marketing which in turn is rapidly evolving into convenience marketing. 
 
Ladies and Gentlemen welcome to the age of social
Meine Damen und Herren willkommen im sozialen Zeitalter 
Mesdames et Messieurs, bienvenue dans l’ère sociale
 
 
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10 Ways for Small and Medium Business to Establish a Social Business Strategy (2/2)

Our world is getting more complex every day.  Technology evolves at a speed that is hardly possible to keep up with.  In Part one, we reviewed the first five ways SMBs can set up a solid social business strategy:
1. Regularly review and refine your company mission, values and goals
2. Keep transforming your content marketing into convenience marketing
3. To blog or not to blog
4. Transform your website into a social hub and its visitors into co-creators
5. Carefully choose your social platforms
 
So here are the five last ways SMBs can establish a solid foundation for a social business:
 
6.  Reinforce and share your company vision
 
Share your company vision to employees, suppliers, customers and prospects on your company website.  Communicate your company vision on all your social networks. Reinforce your core values to customers, suppliers, prospects and anyone your business is coming in contact with.  I can guarantee you that it will be a rewarding experience for both your company and your customers who will better identify your vision and enthusiastically share it with the communities of their choice.  Zappos is well-known for its outstanding company culture and the way CEO Tony Hsieh runs his interviews for both cultural fit and skills requirements. On Zappos’ company blog, Tony publicly shares some of his correspondence for anybody to read: management, co-workers, clients, prospects and suppliers alike.  This is a superb way of spreading company culture while avoiding misunderstandings, promoting transparency and informing everyone.  
 
21st Century World
 
7. Create a dual strategy by combining your brick and mortar shop with a state of the art HTML5 web presence
 
Strive to create a superb online and personal shopping experience while rewarding your customers with loyalty perks and status.  Shoppers often use smartphones and tablets to get access to relevant information.  About.com has qualified three main distinct search types being made on the internet: “answer me (46% of all searches), inspire me (28% of all searches) and educate me (28% of all searches). Wouldn’t it be a great idea to make “answer me, inspire me and educate me” the three-dimensional crusade of your content marketing strategy?  Ask your customers, both online and in your shop, what answers they are looking for?  What inspires them? What educates them?  Gather your customer data directly into your database: the business headquarters of your people-centric customer information center.  This custom-made marketing know-how will help your business tailor make your content marketing output and assist you schedule personalized marketing messages via email or SMS.
 
8. Social, local, mobile (SoLoMo) and free Internet access
 
Would you rather have customers and prospects find out about competitive pricing inside or outside your shop premises?  If they search within your business, it might be easier for you and your staff to find out about competitors’ pricing and promotions.  It will also grant you the chance to intervene and give away “spur of the moment” discounts while bringing in more sales.  Providing customers and prospects with free internet access is a sure way to keep them inside your brick and mortar shop is not it?  No matter what, customers will find out what they want so you might as well give them the chance to do it while there are “browsing” around. It’s time for your business to harness wireless technology and give your visitors the shopping experience of their lives.  Why not consider an indoor positioning system (IPS) and lead your prospects to the right aisles? Why not consider near field communication (NFC) and QR codes to provide visitors with more product information?    
 
QR Codes Europe
 
9.  Free is a wonderful motivator
 
We all love free things don’t we?  The concept of free automatically appeals to our human nature.  Would it be possible to provide your business with a little coffee and snack corner? Could you add a few tables for prospects to linger around and visit?  This could be a wonderful opportunity to create a local’s corner while gathering precious ideas about business dos and don’ts.  Ask your customers what they expect from your business and reward the top ideas with prizes (first, second to five and 11th to 20th or more if you can). Give, share and get altruistically involved with your community.  How about giving away a free coffee for every new Twitter follower or Facebook likes?  Be creative, try new things, and encourage mistakes among co-workers and team members.  One last word of advice from Dan Erwin: “Shift your networking orientation from getting to giving and your long-term success is assured.”
 
10.  Refine your web and shop loyalty program
 
Loyalty programs should become digital and mobile. There are clients combining web and shop loyalty programs who can adapt their products to your specific needs and beyond.  It is fundamental for customers to get rewarded.  Customers both love rewards and status.  Status gives a sense of belonging, a feeling of being part of something bigger.  Among the 36.8 million followers Lady Gaga enjoys on Twitter, she concentrates on the top 1% she names her “little monsters” … “These fans evangelize for her and bring new fans in the fold”.  Lady Gaga understands her fans’ needs to emotionally wanting to connect with her and goes as far as interrupting her concert while calling one of them on the stage with her.  The more customers purchase, the more unique their reward and status development should be.  Think of airlines bronze, silver and gold levels as an example.  Rewards and status are the motivation that channels patrons into buying more of your products and services, but also to evangelize your business.   Be creative, different, and provocative, and reward your customers with an exhaustive loyalty program that shows genuine gratitude towards them. 
 
Now it’s your turn. Which advice would you give a combined brick and mortar digital shop for it to thrive in this contemporary business environment? Looking forward to your comments and suggestions.
 
 
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Three Fundamental Macro Trends Transforming Our Society, the Way we Live and How We Work

We are living in a ubiquitous mobile era and by the way, don’t  we love it?  Could you imagine for a second a world without smartphones or tablets?  Sooner than later we will start out our day by reading our favorite newspaper while shaving in front of the bathroom mirror.  We’ll continue reading while listening to our car audio system driving to work, then on to our Google glasses while walking to the office, finally catching up with the last paragraph either on our tablets, smartphones, laptops or antiquated PCs.

Smartphone statistics 2012 vs 2011

The Guardian reported on February 22:  “Mobile and social are bringing a dramatic cultural shift to the enterprise. The combination of mobile technology and social capabilities creates dynamics that have never before been possible.”

How can we synthesize the major technical trends that have transformed the way we live and the way we work?  In the last 10 years broadband communication has brought upon us three major changes:  mobile, social and cloud.

1. Mobility   

Gartner predicts that by 2013 mobile phones will overtake PCs as the most common Web access device worldwide and that by 2015 over 80 percent of the handsets sold in mature markets will be smartphones.  By 2015 media tablet shipments will reach around 50 percent of laptop shipments and Windows 8 will likely be in third place behind Google’s Android and Apple iOS operating systems.”

Our digital world citizens have acquired more than one billion smartphones in 2011 and 2012 combined, with a 10.10% increase from 2011 (495.3 million units) to 2012 (545.2 million units).  By 2015 there will be 4.9 billion global mobile users.  Those figures are staggering and prove the “smart” mobile shift happening right now in our society.  Our mobile trend opens incredible new business models and opportunities such as mobile marketing, mobile payment, near field communication (NFC), indoor navigation systems and finally 25 billion apps, which have been already downloaded (iOS and Android).

2. Our 21st century social network society

Less than 10 years ago (2004) Mark Zuckerberg launched Facebook, a social network that would turn the way we communicate upside down.  The membership has passed one billion worldwide and forever changed our notion of privacy.  Less than ten years ago it would have been inconceivable to post pictures on a public domain for just about anyone to see, while Google crawlers constantly index the web to improve the company’s search prowess.  Suddenly people are capable of staying in touch with their friends, while uploading their latest picture hunt they proudly want their communities to see.  Meanwhile, other social tools have popped up:

  • LinkedIn — the 200 million professional network was created in 2002
  • Twitter — the micro-blogging site was started by Mike Dorsey in 2006
  • Caterina Fake’s Flickr image posting tool goes back to 2004
  • YouTube, created by former PayPal employees, was launched in 2005
  • Skype, a proprietary Voice over IP (VoIP), was first released in 2003

and the list goes on and on. Business Insider reports on March 21, 2013: “YouTube hits 1 Billion Monthly Users”, a staggering number of people viewing, uploading and sharing videos from the four corners of our planet.  Mobility is allowing communication in real-time, whenever and wherever it happens!  Traditional structures are being by-passed, new business models are being created.  What is going to happen to our libraries?  Virtual worlds and virtual goods can now be created.  What would happen if one day Facebook decided to create its own currency?  Whatever, wherever, whenever is becoming the new norm of ubiquitous digital communication thanks to broadband technology.  

Sharing information on all sorts of platforms (notebooks, smartphones and tablets) is forcing us to centralize our data storage.  How else would we access our Twitter, LinkedIn or Facebook accounts if all the data had to be stored separately and constantly synchronized, as we used to do it between our PCs and Notebooks?

3. Cloud computing to the rescue

Without cloud computing it would be impossible for any of us to own a Google email account, impossible to tweet or to review and update the content of our LinkedIn accounts.  It is estimated there is one exabyte of data stored in the “cloud”.  All our favorite Evernote bits and pieces are stored in the cloud, so are our Facebook pictures, Twitter favorites and Slideshare presentations.  Additionally, many of us are now moving some our personal data (traditionally stored on hard disks) to cloud services such as Box.com, Dropbox and many others.  Cloud services such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), Mountain Lion’s Apple operating system, introducing services such as iCloud, are popping up everywhere.

Consequently, cloud computing has allowed us to centralize the positioning of our personal data and to access it from any “Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) of our choice, thanks to broadband technology supporting our relentless nomadic lifestyles.  Cloud is the engine, the door opener, the way, the modern broadband electricity trail seamlessly granting access to our data, whenever and wherever we want it.  In 1917 Sears ran an advertisement advising people to “use electricity for more than light”.   At the beginning of the 21st century cloud computing technology is here but still in its infancy.  Nikola Tesla (Никола Тесла; July 10 1856 – January 7th 1943), a Serbian-American, was the inventor of the modern alternating current electrical supply system.  As much as electricity would prove to be much more than powering light bulbs, cloud computing gives us the feasible prospect of eliminating local data storage!  Do you know of anyone storing their own electricity?  Sounds ludicrous right?  It could very well become the same with cloud computing.  Buckle up, it’s going to be an interesting ride.  Our children and native digital citizens will someday look at us wondering how on earth we lived without cloud storage, smartphones and broadband communication — the new digital highway of our 21st century wireless, “clouded” and crowded world.

Cloud Computing General

Photo Credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_Computing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Evolution of Big Data: From Descriptive via Predictive to Prescriptive Business Intelligence (BI)

Big data has already become a huge business, and it’s only going to get bigger and even much bigger!  Gartner expects the market for Big data and Analytics to generate € 2.11 trillion (US$ 2.7 trillion) in products and services, and generate 4.4 million new jobs by 2014.  Let’s quickly review the four main areas IBM suggests we should consider when looking at the challenges attached to Big data:
 
i. Big data volume
Every day we create 2.5 quintillion bytes of data (2.5 x 1018).  How do we turn 12 terabytes of daily tweets into improved products sentiment analysis? How do we sort out this massive onslaught of information and filter the relevant Business Intelligence (BI)?  How do we use this information and forecast accurately the development of new products and services to an ever more demanding crowd of ubiquitously digitally connected customers? How do we use these 12 terabytes of daily tweeted information to transform our prospects and customers into brand evangelists?   
 
ii. Big data velocity
How do we analyze the 5 million trade events created each day and identify potential fraud in real time and at best before it even happens?  
 
iii. Big data variety
Big data can be presented as structured and unstructured data, such as videos, pictures, files, audio and text.  Information can be streamed from the internet but also from surveillance cameras to target points of interest.
 
iv. Big data veracity
As the sources of data grow on a daily basis, it behooves us to learn how to trust and rely upon the right data we ought to filter.   As of 2012, about 2.5 exabytes of data are created each day, and that number is doubling every 40 months or so.  However one in three business leaders don’t trust the information they use to make decisions.
 
What are the three main techniques available today for businesses to harness the richness of this present 21st century Big data tidal wave?
 
1. Descriptive Analytics for Big data = HINDSIGHT Business Intelligence.
 
Descriptive Analytics or descriptive data has almost become the antiquated discipline of quantitatively describing the main features of a collection of data.  It can also lead to inductive statistics or the process of drawing a conclusion from data that is subject to random variation.  As a whole, and as its name clearly spells out, it remains solely “descriptive”.   The traditional corporate jokes about Controlling informing Sales about issues Sales had already known about, can serve here as a humorous example of Descriptive Analytics!  Descriptive Analytics has a definite sense of finality, but nonetheless grants us the hindsight to elaborate possible business forecast outcomes.   
  
2. Predictive Analytics for Big data = INSIGHT Business Intelligence.
 
Predictive Analytics encompasses a variety of techniques from statistics and data mining that analyze current and historical facts to make predictions about future events.  It includes modeling, machine learning, data mining and game theory, to analyze current and historical facts and make predictions about future events.  Predictive Analytics can be used to help analyze customer patterns and thus predict future behavior!  Amazon.com “Wish list” is a very good example of predictive analytics allowing Jeff Bezos to gather likes, wishes and interests, thus helping his company to customize specific customer promotions, discounts as well as future product choices.
 
3. Prescriptive Analytics for Big data = FORESIGHT Business Intelligence
 
Prescriptive Analytics is the third phase of Business Analytics (BA).  It is the discipline of synthesizing Big data to make predictions and then to suggest decision options to take advantage of the predictions.  Prescriptive analytics anticipates what will happen, when it will happen and why it will happen.  The interesting aspect of prescriptive analytics is the fact that it can help businesses to foresee possible crisis or problems before they even happen, and thus eliminate the possibility of risky business outcomes.  
 
Most companies still rely on the traditional descriptive data analysis process.  How are you coming along with predictive and prescriptive data analysis in your enterprise?  Looking forward to your insights and comments. 

Salesforce Journey : From CRM to SCRM & becoming a Social Business Strategist Vendor

I attended a Salesforce.com presentation here in Hamburg two months ago and was positively surprised at the genuine way Salesforce Germany presented their company and its (S)CRM-cloud services to the audience.  
Salesforce has been on a shopping spree now for the last two years so I decided to review and log in, hopefully most if not all, the services available to this “Group of companies” they seem to be building at the speed of light! One can also wonder if the integration of all these added services are as swift as Marc Benioff’s proactive, agile and moving forward shopping style! Their latest acquisition is GoInstant a powerful co-browsing interactive Internet tool sharing! GoInstant lets you engage and interact with family members, friends, customers in a “dead-simple & frictionless way”! No software is needed, no downloads!
 
Having an issue with signing documents? Marc Benioff comes to your rescue with Docusign a platform that let you receive and sign any document online on any device thus anywhere! Need to buy a house on the go: No problem, just sign electronically with Docusign and you are ready to go!  Now let’s say you are stuck in Hamburg like me today and would love to spare yourself the exhausting over the pond ride to San Francisco via London or Copenhagen but still need to hold this important meeting while enjoying the commodity of communicating, sharing any form of content via a video conferencing webinar: Here comes Marc Benioff’s help handy again with DimDim, which has also been acquired by Salesforce! 
 
But there are much more tool; here again all of them listed for you with a slide with this slide including the companies’ respective logos:
 
 
1. Buddymedia including Profilebuddy, Reachbuddy, Conversationbuddy, Buybuddy Conversionbuddy, Analytics & Dashboard tools included and allowing user to create and deploy customized interactive content on social network, share the content on the networks, generate engaging conversations, create and manage effective social media campaigns, drive content across social networks and finally analyze your interaction within your network!
2. DimDim: version collaboration, recently acquired by Salesforce, is a video content sharing for webinars & webmeetings of all sorts.
3, Docusign: makes it easy and fast to get your documents signed. Whether you need to close a big sales contract, keep your company trade secrets safe with an NDA or buy a home, Docusign is the easiest, fastest, most secure way to get a signature—anytime, anywhere, on any device.
4. GoInstant: Truly interactive co-browsing is now possible! GoInstant lets us engage and interact with our partners or potential partners in a dead-simple & frictionless way. No clunky software or downloads, just the click of a link and you are sharing in no time!
5. Desk: Ealier known as Assistly is for companies that support a worldwide market and in need of a solution to manage their support communications. Now there is one: with Multilingual Customer Support, you now can support your customers in a language they understand.
6. AppExchange: Need an app? Find, try, and install the right apps—plus find developers and services—for your business.
7. Chatter: Bring the power of social networks inside your company with Chatter—a free, private and secure social network just for your business. With Chatter.com you can connect with your coworkers to work together and be more productive. Updates on the people, projects, and files that you care about most are automatically pushed to you, so you always know what’s going on
8. Data.com: The trusted, proven cloud database for all your social enterprise data.
9. Do.com: Easily create and share tasks, projects, and notes with your team so you always know what needs to get done, no matter where you are
10. Force.com: is the proven cloud platform to automate and extend your business and deliver the social enterprise.
11. Heroku: Build powerful customer apps in Ruby or Java, and instantly deploy and scale them to millions of users.
12. Radian6: Make sense of the social media buzz with social monitoring. Listen, measure, and engage with your customers across the social Web.
13. Remedyforce: was developed by BMC Software and salesforce.com to revolutionize your approach to IT service management. You get ITIL functionality out of the box. Plus you gain peace of mind because it’s built on the Force.com platform.
14. Rypple: Build a results-driven culture with social goals, real-time feedback, open recognition, and easy coaching.
15. Sales Cloud: Give reps and execs what they need to connect with customers and close deals faster.
16. Site.com: Design and publish websites, social pages, and mobile experiences in lightning speed with the first Web CMS in the cloud. It’s built for social, so you can easily add Twitter streams, Facebook likes, and more.
 
Did I forget anything? Please let me know and drop me a note: would also like to read about your personal experiences and thoughts on Salesforce.com and all the acquisitions it has done so far! 
 

Why “big data”, and properly mining it with predictive Business Intelligence Tools, Should Already Drive Our Business Decisions

The data-mining gold rush goes on, but we are reaching new levels all the time as “big data” brothers grow. Data is everywhere but how do we filter the noise? It is called Business Intelligence“ data mining” with BI clients such as IBM, Teradata, Tableau offering SaaS services and out of he box programs to help us make sense of it all. But make sense of what? Let’s put things into perspective with a couple of facts nicely put together by Business Intelligence vendor DOMOEvery minute of the day, 48 Hours of uploaded YouTube videos, 2.000K Google search queries, 571 websites are created, 700K users share a piece of content on Facebook, 100K  Twits sent. Apple receives 47K App downloads … and the list goes on for much more!

Read this carefully: according Birst’s blogue: “By the end of the decade, given the plummeting prices thanks to Moore’s Law, digital sensors will be almost free and embedded in the world in numbers that will make even those consumer product numbers look tiny. . . and all are going to be compiling data on the world and everything taking place in it. This means that, as busy as the digital world is now, by then we’ll likely be spewing out a year’s worth of today’s data in an hour”..

At the time of their IPO process, Facebook made public that they themselves were already moving 20 terabytes of data every day! Marketers and decision makers need specific tools in order to find  out, as Market Samurai puts it, the mots significant gold-nuggets and bits of strategic information in order to make the appropriate business decisions don’t you think? But as Birst writes on its blog: “As for the old IBM’s and Oracle’s: if they don’t adapt, they will be reduced to becoming niche, high-end data specialists. Who needs a gold pan, especially one made of real gold, when you have to find four nuggets of gold in an Everest of rock and dirt”.

Being able to find the right BI tool, filter an over-crowded data universe and   locate this little “je ne sais quoi” has become a matter of business survival! This tiny gold nugget of data will hopefully be transformed into an invaluable marketing strategy or product novelty, which in turn could change our ever growing business acumen for the better but unfortunately also for the worst!

Which BI tools are you using or considering acquiring for your company or clients? What is your decision making process? How do you pick up a vendor?

3 Core reasons why BYOD is only the crawling baby of Enterprise 2.0 competitiveness

Our highly communicative human needs and digital technologies made available have completely overturned the social landscape of the highly connected world we are leaving in! Most of us possess at least two or three public accounts where we share professional & private information with friends, business contacts but also loved ones: It is striking to see how technology trends are driving businesses & marketing but the real revolution of it all is the “People centric” society we are moving into and as CMO Jonathan Becher from SAP says: “big, large, glass buildings do not buy software People do”! SAP, Oracle & IBM used to be IT centric, where you and I had to “adjust” to “their” ways of telling us what to do; now the same vendors are turning around and becoming social, a lot more social being forced to change from a hierarchical to a “wirearchical” thinking! (“Wirearchy” compliment of John Husband @jonhusband)
 
1. Exploding Mobile data consumption
 
BYOD or what I prefer to call BYO3 because there is more than one device by now (Tablet, notebook & Smartphone) are populating our business world as never before! According to Guillermo Escofer: “Mobile data consumption is to grow tenfold over the next five years” He goes on to say “Mobile phone users will, in 2016, on average consume 6.5 times more video, over 8 times as much music and social media, and nearly 10 times as much games as in 2011 according the latest forecasts from Informa Telecoms & Media”. This growth is staggering and much more is to come upon us but particularly upon our mobile phone carriers with a traffic increase from 3.89 trillion MB in 2011 to 39.75 trillion MB in 2016! 
 
2. Big Data Tsunami just started to lashing out on CXOs and Company leaders
 
BigData is completely changing the way we ought to perceive information. According to Dick Weisinger: “Big Data and the related data analytics market segment are expected to grow 40% over the next three years, taking 2010’s annual market size of US$3.2 billion to $16.9 billion by 2015 according IDC. Analyzing data from the past, Business Intelligence will have to adjust and adapt in order to apply a more predictive strategy thus working closely with IT, marketing, controlling & above all customers in order to analyze present trends but also foresee the future as precisely as possible. We all have heard of new companies such as ClouderaKarmasphere or Datammer. All those business are doing much more than “Changing the world one Petabyte at a time”. According  Cloudera we have now 10 times more data than 3 years ago, but “do we know 10 times more about our businesses”? This is a fair and relevant question: How do we store, process, analyze all this in-real-time-data and integrate it seamlessly in all our IT structures and transform it into a predictive analytic-tool made available to our mobile “BYODed” workforce? How are we going to make sense of all this data and synthesize it for our customer’s needs, benefit & superb before and after sales-service? Customer’s virtuous experience circle of excellency must go on right? 
 
 
3. Predictive Data and what it means for the future of our companies
 
Big data is become the limitless marketing’s information blood-flow not only overwhelming Generation X, Echo Boomers or Millenniu ms but especially baby-boomers: a tsunami of “Velocity, Variety and Volume” completely crushing and overtaking our traditional “Old European” hierarchical IT platforms mentalities right? Companies like Apache and their Hadoop approach could increasingly 
become fundamental open source platforms for many companies’ CXOs, who’d better worry about “destroying silo hierarchical” prevailing mentalities as swiftly as possible and start leveraging company crowd-sourcing talents! Time has come to seamlessly integrate Cloud, Storage, Business intelligence, Security IT, Management Software, CRM, SCRM, Operating Systems, Intranet & Extranet to what better place than the Cloud? 
Bigdata forces us to replace our traditional hierarchical management approach to a more wirearchical one: thanks to Jon Husband’s (@jonhusband) fascinating term that macro-captures so well our Enterprise 2.0 trends! Furthermore Charles Zedlewsky Cloudera VP of Products reports that it is not unusual for companies to sift through 100 to 500 Terabytes of data on a daily basis! Will we be soon speaking in yottabyte, zettaby, exabyte or most likely petabyte? How do we make sense of all of this?  BigData “crystallizes as Extreme Information Management Challenges” as Gartner presents it in  a very interesting Cloudera webinar! Big Data comes mostly from “Enterprise Dark Data”: an amount of data which could be coined “unstructured data”, while adding partner, employees, customers, suppliers, public information, social Media and much more!
 
Interesting to notice what BT SecureThinking blog reports in its latest article: “BYOD — it’s now ‘when’ not ‘if’, and China’s leading the way: An incredible 92 per cent of employees in China can take advantage of BYOD, but in the UK less than a third can do this — what does China know that we don’t?” This is again where the traditional “IT Door Keeper” blocs and stops progress. Jeff Schmidt, head of security technology for BT Global Services cuts to the chase: “the security team has to be seen as the enabler not the barrier”! According to Garner, “85% of Fortune 500 organizations will be unable to exploit big data for competitive advantage & Business analytics needs will drive 70% of investments in the expansion and modernization of information infrastructure”
What are your challenges with big data and how do you see the future of dataholic marketers in the upcoming months and years?
 
In my next blog we will look at predictive data and the challenges and chances connected to companies