Category Archives: BYOD

Seven IT Eras Leading CIOs to Become One of the Key Evangelists to a Social Business Strategy (Part 2/2)

In the first part of this two-part series, we reviewed the four IT-eras that have shaped and transformed the CIO role into a digital mediator and one of the key technologists of the new Social Business (Enterprise 2.0) era.  We saw how mainframe computing led to personal computing then followed by Internet and finally the broadband technology.  The consumerization of IT has brought us the “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) movement. BYODs are compelling our 20th century business models (based on the enlightenment era and its resulting industrial revolution) to include workers personal devices such as smartphones, tablets and phablets.           
 
5.  Mobile era
  
Uwe Vielle defines mobile computing as “the ability to use computing capability without a pre-defined location and/or connection to a network to publish and/or subscribe to information.”  Mobility requires new type of softwares or SaaS (Software as a Service) stored in the cloud as well as brand new hardware handsets such as smartphones, tablets and phablets (Samsungs Note II) also known as BYOD.  
 
Post-PC-Era (www.phonedog.com)
 
Two weeks ago, Gartner reported that combined ultra mobile devices, tablets and mobile phone reached 1.872 billion in 2012 and would reach around 2.7 billion by 2017.  Gartner expects a 7.6% decline in PC sales while saying: “This is not a temporary trend induced by a more austere economic environment; it is a reflection of a long-term change in user behavior.”  Broadband and IT-consumerization both contribute to mobility.  Ubiquitous Internet access compels us to centralize our data to a central location: the cloud.
 
6.  Cloud Computing
 
Cloud computing could be compared to the technological shift electricity went through a century ago.  At that time, Thomas Edison favored direct current (DC) systems.  DC was eventually replaced by Guillaume Duchenne’s (1850s) and William Stanley’s (1880s) alternative current (AC).  Alternative current made it much easier to industrialize the production and transport of electricity.  In a similar way the alternative current analogy could be used for cloud computing.  It is not the flow of electric charge that periodically reverses direction, but our computing routines.  IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service), PaaS (Platform as a Service) and SaaS (Software as a Service) deliver the foundation upon which private users can upload their personal digital belongings. 
 
Traditional software vendors like Microsoft are transforming their “one way” Office product into an SaaS platform while offering a 20GB SkyDrive cloud storage.  In May,  Flickr rolled out a whopping 1TB (Terabyte) of cloud-storage for free accounts.  Laptops and notebooks paved the way to mobile computing.  Consumerization of IT brought the diversity of multi-screen computing via smartphone, tablet and phablet devices.  This newly acquired ubiquitous mobile  flexibility threatens the very livelihood of US-PC giants such as Dell and Hewlett Packard.   
 
7.  Post PC era
 
Broadband, mobility and cloud computing confirm the steady decline in the sales of personal computers in favor of “post-PC” BOYDs.  BYOD threatens the use of traditional software in favor of cross-platform applications such as Android, Java or iOS.  In 1999, Microsoft CEO Bill Gates coined this development as the “PC Plus” era.  In 2007, Steve Job renamed it the “post-PC device” era.  According to IDC the U.S. PC market contracted 12.7% year-to-year with a 18.3% decline compared to the fourth quarter of 2012.  “A new report from International Data Corporation (IDC) shows a 13.9% decline in first quarter PC shipments compared to 2012.  The ‘year-on-year contraction marked the worst quarter since IDC began tracking the PC market quarterly in 1994,’ according to IDC.”  
 
Post-PC-Era (www.intomobile.com)-medium
 
The US PC-industry is in a dire position.  Last year Hewlett Packard announced that it would lay off over 27,000 employees.  Dell’s troublesome privatization endeavors are still going on and a 274-page proxy filing  states,  “Dell – the company and the man – wants to move away from PCs because making money in the global PC market is about as easy as selling tap water in a rainstorm”. 
 
8.  Social Business   
 
Not too long ago, the CIO was considered (and in many cases still is) the technological IT-drill sergeant in many companies.  He was the technological door keeper, who in the name of “security” only granted employees the right to specific choices of hardware and software.  A major shift began when computing mobility entered enterprises with the use of laptops and notebooks.  Emails and data access became mandatory and VPN (virtual private networks) were created.  Consumerization of IT could be for the former CIO king what the 1789 French Revolution was to Louis XIV.  CIOs are losing their controlling grip and are forced to accept the BYOD revolution and the respective operating systems such as Symbian, iOS, Android, Window & Blackberry to name just a few.  Added to this culinary buffet of BOYDs and operating systems let’s not forget our newly acquired social media channels.  Social media are transforming customer service, experience and marketing altogether and terminates the traditional hierarchical company customer communication era.  Traditional outbound marketing methods (pay, pray and spray) are being replaced with inbound/content marketing which in turn is rapidly evolving into convenience marketing. 
 
Ladies and Gentlemen welcome to the age of social
Meine Damen und Herren willkommen im sozialen Zeitalter 
Mesdames et Messieurs, bienvenue dans l’ère sociale
 
 
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Three Fundamental Macro Trends Transforming Our Society, the Way we Live and How We Work

We are living in a ubiquitous mobile era and by the way, don’t  we love it?  Could you imagine for a second a world without smartphones or tablets?  Sooner than later we will start out our day by reading our favorite newspaper while shaving in front of the bathroom mirror.  We’ll continue reading while listening to our car audio system driving to work, then on to our Google glasses while walking to the office, finally catching up with the last paragraph either on our tablets, smartphones, laptops or antiquated PCs.

Smartphone statistics 2012 vs 2011

The Guardian reported on February 22:  “Mobile and social are bringing a dramatic cultural shift to the enterprise. The combination of mobile technology and social capabilities creates dynamics that have never before been possible.”

How can we synthesize the major technical trends that have transformed the way we live and the way we work?  In the last 10 years broadband communication has brought upon us three major changes:  mobile, social and cloud.

1. Mobility   

Gartner predicts that by 2013 mobile phones will overtake PCs as the most common Web access device worldwide and that by 2015 over 80 percent of the handsets sold in mature markets will be smartphones.  By 2015 media tablet shipments will reach around 50 percent of laptop shipments and Windows 8 will likely be in third place behind Google’s Android and Apple iOS operating systems.”

Our digital world citizens have acquired more than one billion smartphones in 2011 and 2012 combined, with a 10.10% increase from 2011 (495.3 million units) to 2012 (545.2 million units).  By 2015 there will be 4.9 billion global mobile users.  Those figures are staggering and prove the “smart” mobile shift happening right now in our society.  Our mobile trend opens incredible new business models and opportunities such as mobile marketing, mobile payment, near field communication (NFC), indoor navigation systems and finally 25 billion apps, which have been already downloaded (iOS and Android).

2. Our 21st century social network society

Less than 10 years ago (2004) Mark Zuckerberg launched Facebook, a social network that would turn the way we communicate upside down.  The membership has passed one billion worldwide and forever changed our notion of privacy.  Less than ten years ago it would have been inconceivable to post pictures on a public domain for just about anyone to see, while Google crawlers constantly index the web to improve the company’s search prowess.  Suddenly people are capable of staying in touch with their friends, while uploading their latest picture hunt they proudly want their communities to see.  Meanwhile, other social tools have popped up:

  • LinkedIn — the 200 million professional network was created in 2002
  • Twitter — the micro-blogging site was started by Mike Dorsey in 2006
  • Caterina Fake’s Flickr image posting tool goes back to 2004
  • YouTube, created by former PayPal employees, was launched in 2005
  • Skype, a proprietary Voice over IP (VoIP), was first released in 2003

and the list goes on and on. Business Insider reports on March 21, 2013: “YouTube hits 1 Billion Monthly Users”, a staggering number of people viewing, uploading and sharing videos from the four corners of our planet.  Mobility is allowing communication in real-time, whenever and wherever it happens!  Traditional structures are being by-passed, new business models are being created.  What is going to happen to our libraries?  Virtual worlds and virtual goods can now be created.  What would happen if one day Facebook decided to create its own currency?  Whatever, wherever, whenever is becoming the new norm of ubiquitous digital communication thanks to broadband technology.  

Sharing information on all sorts of platforms (notebooks, smartphones and tablets) is forcing us to centralize our data storage.  How else would we access our Twitter, LinkedIn or Facebook accounts if all the data had to be stored separately and constantly synchronized, as we used to do it between our PCs and Notebooks?

3. Cloud computing to the rescue

Without cloud computing it would be impossible for any of us to own a Google email account, impossible to tweet or to review and update the content of our LinkedIn accounts.  It is estimated there is one exabyte of data stored in the “cloud”.  All our favorite Evernote bits and pieces are stored in the cloud, so are our Facebook pictures, Twitter favorites and Slideshare presentations.  Additionally, many of us are now moving some our personal data (traditionally stored on hard disks) to cloud services such as Box.com, Dropbox and many others.  Cloud services such as Amazon Web Services (AWS), Mountain Lion’s Apple operating system, introducing services such as iCloud, are popping up everywhere.

Consequently, cloud computing has allowed us to centralize the positioning of our personal data and to access it from any “Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) of our choice, thanks to broadband technology supporting our relentless nomadic lifestyles.  Cloud is the engine, the door opener, the way, the modern broadband electricity trail seamlessly granting access to our data, whenever and wherever we want it.  In 1917 Sears ran an advertisement advising people to “use electricity for more than light”.   At the beginning of the 21st century cloud computing technology is here but still in its infancy.  Nikola Tesla (Никола Тесла; July 10 1856 – January 7th 1943), a Serbian-American, was the inventor of the modern alternating current electrical supply system.  As much as electricity would prove to be much more than powering light bulbs, cloud computing gives us the feasible prospect of eliminating local data storage!  Do you know of anyone storing their own electricity?  Sounds ludicrous right?  It could very well become the same with cloud computing.  Buckle up, it’s going to be an interesting ride.  Our children and native digital citizens will someday look at us wondering how on earth we lived without cloud storage, smartphones and broadband communication — the new digital highway of our 21st century wireless, “clouded” and crowded world.

Cloud Computing General

Photo Credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cloud_Computing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 More Reasons Why Human Resources Must Become the Control Center for any Social Business Enterprise 2.0 Transformation (Part2)

In the previous article, we discussed 4 reasons why HR needs to abandon its traditional administrative role and become the company cultural citadel and flagship. We could compare HR to the helm of an “Enterprise Culture” ship, with its crew steering the company towards its “cultural destination” and in this way, having much more leverage than a mere rule enforcer. In order to become the motivational driving force of the business overall, HR must learn to meld together different mentalities, cultural tribes and department units. HR must also foster the collective mission of an employee-centric company’s vision and values, i.e. culture. But what are some of the technological, digital and disruptive challenges our traditional personnel management is faced with when bringing the Millennial Generation (Generation Y) onto the company’s payroll?

1. HR must understand and accept the rich & ubiquitous nature of Digital Communication

Broadband connectivity has changed the way we work and communicate. Tablets, phablets and smartphones are found and used everywhere, and recent statistics estimate there are already 2.5 billion mobile social accounts worldwide! As if this deluge of portably-connected devices (also known as “Bring Your Own Device”) was not enough, our traditional 20th century “Dr. Prof. Expert” has transformed himself into a powerful, multi-faceted big-data information giant. This new 21st century digital expert has granted himself a previously unknown crown of knowledge: the hyperlink. This invisible digital inline link can display remote content without displaying the content; it is to be found in many e-articles and has become the new punctuation sign you and I have to contend with!

The hyperlink is the hidden command which has literally transformed our traditional book (with its attached footnotes) into a never-ending reading ordeal! Watch out, while e-reading, that you do not get “hyperlinked-away” and end up wondering where your reading actually started! This new punctuation sign has now given us the technological agility to research any topic at scale. It is the reason why (after roughly two hundred fifty years) Encyclopædia Britannica went out of print, and 300 years later Internet overtook newspapers ad revenues.  How will HR undertake the transformation of this well known archaic enterprise legacy and adapt it to our “hyper-linked”, 21st century digital and highly-connected workplace or wirearchy without losing the necessary line of command?

2. HR TO BECOME THE TRANSFORMATIONAL DIGITAL ZEITGEIST OF LAST CENTURY’S HIERARCHICAL BUSINESS LEGACY

Complete removal of the hierarchical legacy from a company’s organigram seems highly impossible. Every enterprise needs a boss, a visionary, a strategist who guides the mission, inspires the ranks and carries the overall corporate social responsibility vis-à-vis the owner or the company shareholders. But here are examples of quite a different approach. IIya Pozin, writing about his company Ciplex, says: “There is no such thing as ‘management’. There are no departments. Those fancy job titles, like VP, executive, and manager are gone”.  What is worth noticing here is Illy Pozin’s completely different view on company hierarchy.  He continues: “I recently inverted our organizational chart.  Our clients are now positioned up at the top, while our employees make up teams stationed in the middle, and our higher-ups are no longer higher-ups — they are now known as ‘team support’ and they reside at the bottom of the chart.”! IIya Pozin genuinely promotes team culture.  He goes on to write: “You need self-motivated, self-sustaining teams, instead of individual employees below your clients. This fosters a culture in which teams are motivated to succeed together, rather than individuals. It creates a shared sense of responsibility throughout the company. At Ciplex, we create team goals to measure and improve upon every two weeks. This way, everyone becomes a valuable asset.”

Claire Suddath, reporter for Bloomberg Businessweek, wrote an enlightening article about the company Valve Software.  In “Why There Are No Bosses at Valve” (Valve Software company handbook), co-founder Gabe Newell states: “Of all the people at this company who aren’t your boss, Gabe is the MOST not your boss, if you get what were saying,” the handbook says.  Claire Suddath goes on to write:  “Every Valve employee has hiring capabilities, as well as the power to green-light an idea.  It’s basically the Montessori version of running a company. Somehow this results in completed projects and top-notch video games.”

3. HR TO HIRE TALENT MATCHING COMPANY CULTURE, & SECURE PERSONNEL EXPANSION

HR should hire first for passion and second for skills! What would be the outcome if a multi-talented hiree happened to “row in the opposite direction” of the company culture?  Some of my readers may think that I am on a cultural bandwagon or crusade, but please bear with me, and let’s look at a cultural misfit example we’ve all read and heard about: The Hewlett-Packard/ Compaq merger case:

In 2001 the Hewlett-Packard computer giant acquired Compaq for US$ 24 billion — the largest IT deal ever made!  Combining workforces and operations in more than 150 countries (with roughly 150,000 employees) must have been a daunting task to undertake, but particularly so for HR. Restructuring both businesses was an intimidating challenge that turned out to be a disastrous cultural match. HP originated mostly from an engineering background, while Compaq from a “door-to-door” sales mentality.  This merger was considered a failure and HP was forced to make dramatic leadership and cultural changes to make things work. Could it be that the results of the consequences of that merger are still evident even to this day?   CEO Meg Whitman recently pointed to a lack of clarity around the company’s strategy as well as heavy executive turnover.  Who knows?

HR now has a golden opportunity to start molding and shaping Generation Y hirees (soon to replace baby boomers), to bestow upon them crystal clear cultural beliefs and values, impart the necessary ethics, and to finally turn them into real company spokespeople and brand evangelists.  And even more so, HR has the responsibility to set up the right working environment and transform the attitudes of the workforce into a highly motivated group of engaged employees. It is crucial that co-workers possess the inner satisfaction of having a clear mission, of serving a purpose and delivering outstanding products or services. When HR Daily Advisor SPHR, MBA Kojo Amissah was asked to define HR he gave this most unusual and amazing reply:  “HR is about the business to the extent to which you can utilize people to obtain business goals.”  Some of the structural challenges HR is facing nowadays in modern companies could be perfectly summed up by Dan Pontefract: “Our organizations are built on 19th century learning styles, coupled by 20th century leadership models fused with 21st century technology.”

4. HR TO BECOME THE PROMOTIONAL ENGINE OF SUSTAINABLE EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT

A recent Towers Watson Global 2012 Workforce Study reveals how the views of employees directly shape their engagement in their work, commitment to their employers, and ultimately their behavior and performance on the job. The study reflects the attitudes and concerns of workers around the world. It also points out that the traditional definition for engagement is shifting and reshaping itself into a 21st century “dernier cri” term of “sustainable engagement”. As we read above, companies are running 21st century businesses in 20th century workplaces. The resulting lack of employee engagement is staggering to say the least:
– 35% employees are highly engaged
– 22% employees are unsupportive
– 17% employees are detached
– 26% employees are disengaged
 
Don’t you think it is time for companies to start attracting, motivating and retaining the right cadre of employees     – those who will best benefit the corporate business identity? What will be the mid and long-term consequences of HR developing a “sustainable engagement” environment for its workers? The Tower Watson study quantifies the direct relationship between employee output, engagement and motivation on the job, and the level of operating margin an enterprise is able to record. It also shows that the higher the level of engagement, the higher the average operating profit will be: 
– Companies with low engagement scores have an average operating margin of 10%
– Companies with high traditional engagement an average margin of 14%
– Companies with the highest level of “sustainable engagement” an average of 27%
 
What is the line of attack your company is applying in order to reverse those trends? How is your HR department raising the employee level of engagement?
 
Follow Bruno Gebarski on Twitter: https://twitter.com/BrunoGebarski@brunogebarski or on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brunogebarski
Related posts to Social Business i.e. Enterprise 2.0:
-4 Reasons Why Human Resources Must Become the Control Center to any Social Business Enterprise 2.0 Transformation (Part 1)
3 Ways to Promote Your Employee Engagement and Increase Your Social Business Enterprise 2.0 Productivity
4 More Ways for Leaders to Promote Personnel Engagement in Social Business Enterprise 2.0
Why Are People, Processes and Platforms the Three Fundamental P’s of Any Social Business Enterprise 2.0 transformation?
Why Company Culture is The Foundation to Any Social Business Enterperise 2.0
Understanding the 4 Fundamentals of a Social Business Enterprise 2.0

7 Considerations When Evaluating BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) Implementation

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) is here to stay and the consumerization of IT is staggering to say the least! When checking the latest IDC figures one can only wonder about the mobile revolution and its consequences within the social enterprise! According to IDC, 2Q2012 worldwide smartphones vendors shipped more than 150 million devices; the battle ground remains between Samsung and its wonderful Galaxy III with roughly 33% market shares [50 million devices shipped] & Apple with 17% of the market [26 million devices shipped]. Nokia’s market shares are dwindling like snow melting in the sun as the Finish vendor went down from 8.21% [Q112] to 6,7% [Q212] market shares with 10 million units being shipped.

The PC era is not dead but somewhat losing ground to the new virtual workplace necessary today for the Y generation mobile workforce in need of agility, flexibility and above all remote access to company data, apps & software. Rolling out a successful BYOD strategy is tricky but if you are looking for resources remember all the main vendors are providing ample white paper as well as case studies when it comes to implementing a ratified BYOD strategy and policy within your own premises.

1. Get the right foundation with C-Level involvement

Let’s bear in mind that our traditional PC/Notebook workstation is not fully fitted to the mobile environment unfolding in front of us and no BYOD policy template is available since requirements and corporate priorities need to be defined on a one to one basis. It is of the utmost importance to require C-Level involvement and support right of the bat and have your BYOD architect closely work with IT, HR, Legal departments in order to establish the right foundation. This is also a wonderful opportunity to consider more data stewardship towards your traditional PC & Notebook workstations.

2. Assess carefully your present legacy policies, type of mobile device involved and practices

Heavily consider MDM (Mobile Device Management) IT oversight & support. We all like our freedom but let’s face it folks, security and responsibility is mandatory if mobility is to allow us comfortable and secure remote company data access! Take a solid inventory of all the present devices in use including platforms, OS, privately or company owned, data used and access technology available such as Wi-Fi, VPN, Bluetooth, cellular or bridge to workstation.

3. Find out from your end-users what their real needs are

Remember your end-users should become your strongest advocates when it comes to a successful BYOD strategy and policy implementation, so get them onboard early and find out about their genuine company needs especially from those who are mobile or work remotely! Bear in mind workplace, geography, authentication, mobile apps, mobile device ownership and expected level of support.

4. Establish a clear and ratified BYOD platform support

Which OS & devices types are you considering? What is end-users support for both company and privately owned devices going to be like? How can we expect IT to give the required level and quality of service if suddenly faced with devices they have not considered in the first place?

5. Chose carefully your Mobile Device Management (MDM) tools and technologies

MDM tools can help your company define device access compliance thanks to a choice of onsite or cloud-based supervision. Consider user authentication for both device and services login whether in your corporate network or in the cloud. Secure Web Gateways (SWGs) will help your BYOD program into monitoring possible malware, fraud or leakage threats!  Bear in mind the growing array of apps. Consider future app development and private app store for managing and distributing apps endorsed by your company and include a Mobile Application Management (MAM) program while you are at it. MEAP (Mobile Enterprise Application Platform) also need to be reviewed and considered. MEAPs address the difficulties of developing mobile software by managing the diversity of devices, networks and user groups at the time of deployment and throughout the mobile solution’s lifecycle.

6. Review the content of your BYOD policy

Define HR and IT’s responsibilities and liability. Describe BYOD hardware, software, OS and apps administration management including data encryption for sensitive data, loss and theft responsibilities, authentication and pins. Define lock and wipe features and make sure your employees are informed about this very specific policy as soon as you hire them! Limit sensitive system access to servers via VPN and Gartner even recommends “wiping and rebuilding when returning from trips to high-risk countries.

7. Ratify your preliminary BYOD policy

This should be the first preliminary document handed out to employees and signed by them and their respective supervisor before usage including definitions of BYOD, responsibilities for companies and privately owned devices, user liability. Carefully chose a limited amount of users and test the policy 4 weeks long. With the help and comments of the participants redefine and review areas that need improvement and refine your policy until a second test rollout can be started again.

What difficulties are you encountering when planning a BYOD strategy? What are the challenges your company is facing? Let us know and we will include your suggestions and ideas in upcoming articles.

3 Core reasons why BYOD is only the crawling baby of Enterprise 2.0 competitiveness

Our highly communicative human needs and digital technologies made available have completely overturned the social landscape of the highly connected world we are leaving in! Most of us possess at least two or three public accounts where we share professional & private information with friends, business contacts but also loved ones: It is striking to see how technology trends are driving businesses & marketing but the real revolution of it all is the “People centric” society we are moving into and as CMO Jonathan Becher from SAP says: “big, large, glass buildings do not buy software People do”! SAP, Oracle & IBM used to be IT centric, where you and I had to “adjust” to “their” ways of telling us what to do; now the same vendors are turning around and becoming social, a lot more social being forced to change from a hierarchical to a “wirearchical” thinking! (“Wirearchy” compliment of John Husband @jonhusband)
 
1. Exploding Mobile data consumption
 
BYOD or what I prefer to call BYO3 because there is more than one device by now (Tablet, notebook & Smartphone) are populating our business world as never before! According to Guillermo Escofer: “Mobile data consumption is to grow tenfold over the next five years” He goes on to say “Mobile phone users will, in 2016, on average consume 6.5 times more video, over 8 times as much music and social media, and nearly 10 times as much games as in 2011 according the latest forecasts from Informa Telecoms & Media”. This growth is staggering and much more is to come upon us but particularly upon our mobile phone carriers with a traffic increase from 3.89 trillion MB in 2011 to 39.75 trillion MB in 2016! 
 
2. Big Data Tsunami just started to lashing out on CXOs and Company leaders
 
BigData is completely changing the way we ought to perceive information. According to Dick Weisinger: “Big Data and the related data analytics market segment are expected to grow 40% over the next three years, taking 2010’s annual market size of US$3.2 billion to $16.9 billion by 2015 according IDC. Analyzing data from the past, Business Intelligence will have to adjust and adapt in order to apply a more predictive strategy thus working closely with IT, marketing, controlling & above all customers in order to analyze present trends but also foresee the future as precisely as possible. We all have heard of new companies such as ClouderaKarmasphere or Datammer. All those business are doing much more than “Changing the world one Petabyte at a time”. According  Cloudera we have now 10 times more data than 3 years ago, but “do we know 10 times more about our businesses”? This is a fair and relevant question: How do we store, process, analyze all this in-real-time-data and integrate it seamlessly in all our IT structures and transform it into a predictive analytic-tool made available to our mobile “BYODed” workforce? How are we going to make sense of all this data and synthesize it for our customer’s needs, benefit & superb before and after sales-service? Customer’s virtuous experience circle of excellency must go on right? 
 
 
3. Predictive Data and what it means for the future of our companies
 
Big data is become the limitless marketing’s information blood-flow not only overwhelming Generation X, Echo Boomers or Millenniu ms but especially baby-boomers: a tsunami of “Velocity, Variety and Volume” completely crushing and overtaking our traditional “Old European” hierarchical IT platforms mentalities right? Companies like Apache and their Hadoop approach could increasingly 
become fundamental open source platforms for many companies’ CXOs, who’d better worry about “destroying silo hierarchical” prevailing mentalities as swiftly as possible and start leveraging company crowd-sourcing talents! Time has come to seamlessly integrate Cloud, Storage, Business intelligence, Security IT, Management Software, CRM, SCRM, Operating Systems, Intranet & Extranet to what better place than the Cloud? 
Bigdata forces us to replace our traditional hierarchical management approach to a more wirearchical one: thanks to Jon Husband’s (@jonhusband) fascinating term that macro-captures so well our Enterprise 2.0 trends! Furthermore Charles Zedlewsky Cloudera VP of Products reports that it is not unusual for companies to sift through 100 to 500 Terabytes of data on a daily basis! Will we be soon speaking in yottabyte, zettaby, exabyte or most likely petabyte? How do we make sense of all of this?  BigData “crystallizes as Extreme Information Management Challenges” as Gartner presents it in  a very interesting Cloudera webinar! Big Data comes mostly from “Enterprise Dark Data”: an amount of data which could be coined “unstructured data”, while adding partner, employees, customers, suppliers, public information, social Media and much more!
 
Interesting to notice what BT SecureThinking blog reports in its latest article: “BYOD — it’s now ‘when’ not ‘if’, and China’s leading the way: An incredible 92 per cent of employees in China can take advantage of BYOD, but in the UK less than a third can do this — what does China know that we don’t?” This is again where the traditional “IT Door Keeper” blocs and stops progress. Jeff Schmidt, head of security technology for BT Global Services cuts to the chase: “the security team has to be seen as the enabler not the barrier”! According to Garner, “85% of Fortune 500 organizations will be unable to exploit big data for competitive advantage & Business analytics needs will drive 70% of investments in the expansion and modernization of information infrastructure”
What are your challenges with big data and how do you see the future of dataholic marketers in the upcoming months and years?
 
In my next blog we will look at predictive data and the challenges and chances connected to companies